Prof. Dr. Christian Kandler is the head of the SPeADy project. He is professor of differential and personality psychology at the MSB Medical School Berlin since April 2017. His research has long been directed towards the development of personality and his work has been published in high-ranking national and international journals. The studies themselves are coordinated by M.Sc. Alexandra Zapko-Willmes and M.Sc. Julia Richter. They can be contacted via the studies’ email addresses. Additionally, the projects’ staff is supported by the student research assistants B.Sc. Angelika Penner, B. Sc. Hannah Sarnizei, Elif Yalcin, and Annika Overlander.

 

For contact details see “Contact“.

The SPeADy research team

Prof. Dr. Christian Kandler

Christian Kandler received his diploma in psychology in 2007 at Friedrich Schiller University Jena. During this time, he worked as a student assistant in the DFG research unit part project “Jena Twin Study of Social Attitudes”, and as a psychotherapeutic intern at the clinic for psychotherapy and psychosomatic medicine of the ASKLEPIOS Fachklinikum Stadtroda. After his graduation, he conducted research and taught as a research assistant (2007-2012), assistant professor (2012-2016) and interim professor (2016-2017) at the chair of Differential Psychology, Personality and Psychological Assessment at Bielefeld University. There, he completed his doctorate thesis in 2010, entitled “The Nature of Personality: Validity, Continuiety and Interaction of the Genetic Make-up and Environment”, and received the venia legendi in psychology in 2017; his habilitation thesis was entitled “Genotype-Environment Interplay of Personality Development”.
Since October 2015, he has been supervising the SPeADy research project and since April 2017, he has been giving lectures and conducting research as professor of Differential and Personality Psychology at the Faculty of Natural Sciences at MSB Medical School Berlin. Moreover, as of October 2016, he is co-editor of the European Journal of Personality.

M.Sc. Julia Richter

Julia Richter received the bachlor’s degree in psychology at University of Münster in 2013, and the master’s degree in psychology at Friedrich Schiller University Jena in 2016. During her studies in Jena, she spent a term abroad in Sevilla, Spain. She has worked as a student assistant at the chair of Psychological Assessment and Personality Psychology at University of Münster and in Dr. Julia Zimmermann’s project “PEDES – Personality Development of Sojourners” in Jena and in Hagen. Presently, she is working as a research assistant at the chair of Differential Psychology, Personality Psychology and Psychological Assessment at Bielefeld University for Prof. Dr. Christian Kandler’s DFG project “Study of Personality Architecture and Dynamics (SPeADy)”, coordinating the age groups study. She is also working on her dissertation with the prospective title “Personality changes over the life course”.

M.Sc. Alexandra Zapko-Willmes

Alexandra Zapko-Willmes received her bachelor’s degree in psychology at Trier University in 2011 and graduated at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf with a master’s degree in psychology in 2014. During this time, she completed social psychological research internships at University of Cologne and Cardiff University and worked as a student assistant at the Institute of Experimental Biological Psychology at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf. Her master thesis, written in 2014, was entitled “Emotional mimicry of (moral) disgust”. In 2014, she worked at the Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine in Göttingen, where she surveyed patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorders and autism spectrum disorders.
Since September 2015, she has been working in the SPeADy research project, coordinating the twin family study. For this purpose, she was employed as a research assistant at the chair of Differential Psychology, Personality and Psychological Assessment at Bielefeld University, and is employed as a research assistant at MSB Medical School Berlin since April 2017. She is writing her doctorate thesis on differential morality, value orientations and sociopolitical attitudes from a behavior genetic perspective.